Meltzer, Lippe, Goldstein & Breitstone, LLP
"Want more? Demand Better! Hire Us."

Bloomberg BNA: Latest Labor and Employment Cases for June 5, 2018 - "Wage Payment"


Superintendents and other property caretakers for a New York apartment rental company can’t add a claim for the company’s supposed failure to pay their agreed wage rate to their lawsuit for unpaid overtime and minimum wages. (Contrera vs. Langer)

For more information, click on the link below:
https://www.bna.com/latest-labor-employment-n73014476264/

 




LIBN: If employee complains of harassment – What next?


When an employee comes forward with a sexual harassment complaint, it’s important for companies to take immediate action, attorneys and HR pros say. “It’s incumbent on the company to conduct a swift, decisive investigation,” said Larry Martinez, partner and co-chair of the labor and employment practice group at Meltzer Lippe in Mineola. Most companies have anti-harassment policies, but many are not adept at responding appropriately to a complaint.




LIBN: Harassment April 2018


When an employee comes forward with a sexual harassment complaint, it’s important for companies to take immediate action, attorneys and HR pros say.
“It’s incumbent on the company to conduct a swift, decisive investigation,” said Larry Martinez, partner and co-chair of the labor and employment practice group at Meltzer Lippe in Mineola.
Most companies have anti-harassment policies, but many are not adept at responding appropriately to a complaint.




Trusts & Estates: Educating Clients Before It's Too Late


Avi Z. Kestenbaum shares his thoughts on accomplishing a complex mission.

 




Trusts & Estates: Beware of Hidden Dangers When Taking On New Clients


Avi Z. Kestenbaum and Jason J. Smith address practical and ethical considerations.

 




Jeffrey A. Galant and Dana L. Mark on CRI-Leslie - Musings on Plain Meaning, Absurdity and Capital Gain


“The importance of capital gain treatment may have lessened under the new tax law (PL 115-97)i due to the reduction in the corporate tax rate to 21% and the 20% pass through deduction.ii However, capital gain treatment is certainly still meaningful. That being said, a recent noteworthy case is CRI-Leslie, LLC v Commissioner. CRI-Leslie found against capital gain treatment in a matter of first impression. However, the decision’s greater importance may be its illustration of the methodology used by the courts to interpret the relevant Code provisions. Or, more to the point, whether the courts were justified in relying on the plain meaning rule rather than the legislative history in determining what the Code provisions mean.”




New York Real Estate Journal: : Preliminary injunction issued against Oyster Bay apprenticeship code


A United States District Court Judge has issued a preliminary injunction against the Town of Oyster Bay preventing the town from further enforcement of apprenticeship requirements for contractors and developers.




Locust Valley Leader: Letter to Editor


In a decision of significant economic consequence to every contractor who operates in the Town of Oyster Bay, the Meltzer Lippe legal team recently won a temporary restraining order against the Town of Oyster Bay, which last September passed an ordinance which imposed a new requirement on contractors and developers seeking to perform work for which a permit is required on commercial properties of 100,000 square feet or more.




Newsday: Judge blocks Oyster Bay's apprenticeship program requirements


Newsday – February 12, 2018

A federal judge has stopped Oyster Bay from enforcing a law that forces contractors on large projects to meet new apprenticeship program requirements.
U.S. District Judge Denis R. Hurley in Central Islip issued a preliminary injunction against the town on Feb. 7 that it cannot enforce an amendment to a law adopted by the town board on Sept. 12 on any contract in which the town is not a direct or indirect party.




LIBN: Court puts brakes on Oyster Bay's apprenticeship law


On February 7, 2018 a preliminary injunction was issued against the Town of Oyster Bay, preventing the Town from enforcing apprenticeship program requirements as set forth in the Town Code against private construction projects for the duration of the case.

In a decision of significant economic consequence to every contractor who operates in the Town of Oyster Bay, Meltzer Lippe’s Labor & Employment legal team previously won a temporary restraining order against the Town of Oyster Bay, which last September passed an ordinance which imposed a new requirement on contractors and developers seeking to perform work for which a permit is required on commercial properties of 100,000 square feet or more. The Federal Court extended the TRO into the preliminary injunction. This permits all contractors to work on wholly private construction projects of any size within the Town regardless of whether they are affiliated with an apprenticeship program which meets the Town’s new requirements.

Meltzer Lippe’s litigation and the court’s decision has been recognized as a key victory and is strongly supported by Long Island businesses. Both the Association for a Better Long Island and the Long Island Builders Institute have issued public statements supporting the litigation and court’s decision. To read the full article, please click on the link below:

https://libn.com/2018/02/08/court-puts-brakes-on-oyster-bays-apprenticeship-law/